DATA-DRIVEN FARMING

This article was published in the March 2016 issue. 

Inspiration: Farmers told Vincent Kimura they needed an affordable way to protect their crops and increase their yields. Once he had an idea to address that problem, he teamed with Ryan Ozawa, Isar Mostafanezhad and Justin Hedani to create the mobile and desktop app called Smart Yields. It is part of the latest cohort of Blue Startups’ companies.

To read more, go to: http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/data-driven-farming/

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20 for the next 20: Donovan Kealoha

Published in the March 2016 issue.

DONAVAN KEALOHA HAS ALWAYS been an entrepreneur. “I remember learning the art of arbitrage at a very early age: Getting something for cheap, then turning around and selling it at an increased price.”

UH law school gave him access to the business world, and he founded his first company while still there. Kealoha counts as his biggest accomplishments starting several companies and organizations that continue to positively affect Hawaii. One is the nonprofit Purple Maia, which he says puts STEM in a Hawaiian context and helps underserved youth in Hawaii.

To read more, go to: http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/20-for-the-next-20-2016/

20 for the next 20: Austin Kino

Published in the March 2016 issue.

AS AN APPRENTICE navigator, Austin Kino is helping keep the skill and practice of Polynesian sailing alive. While in high school at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama, he joined up with PVS as a member of Kapu Na Keiki, a group of young sailors that trained with the crew of Hokulea, and, in May 2014, he sailed on the ship’s first leg to Tahiti.

“To see an island for your first time and kind of pull it out of the sea – that’s the expression of the navigator, ‘We’ll fish an island out of the sea.’ Even though we weren’t doing it by ourselves, we were doing it with a group of four of us, it was a really overwhelming feeling to be completely isolated, surrounded by ocean for 16 days and then, on the 17th day, to see land and to feel a little bit of that success was pretty life changing.”

To read more, go to: http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/20-for-the-next-20-2016/

20 for the next 20: Colin Yost

Published in the March 2016 issue.

COLIN YOST’S INTEREST in the environment started in childhood. He grew up in a small cabin with water that came from a stream. “I was an only child and I had no neighbors. There’s a national forest right in the back of our cabin, and I just spent a lot of my time in nature, really learning to appreciate its beauty and significance,” he says.

Before he joined Revolusun, Yost worked as an assistant attorney general in the financial fraud division of the Oregon Department of Justice. He moved to Hawaii in 2003 and worked at a few firms, maintaining his interests in environmental and civil rights cases. When asked to join Revolusun, he says, “I jumped at the opportunity, because I knew I’d be able to do something I believed in 100 percent of the time.”

To read more, go to: http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/20-for-the-next-20-2016/

20 for the next 20: Ma Ry Kim

Published in the March 2016 issue. 

WHEN MA RY KIM TAUGHT architecture at UH, she’d always start with a question: When is a brick not a brick? The explanation: When it’s a refrigerator. If a brick is packed in snow overnight, its “DNA” will absorb the cold and, by morning, it can help keep food cold, she says.

This is her design philosophy: transform our assumptions about things and human needs – “To look beyond the obvious. … Everything is a puzzle, and sometimes it takes people to put the pieces back together and figure the puzzle out,” she says.

To read more, go to: http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/20-for-the-next-20-2016/

Buy, Sell, Or Hold?

This article was published in the February 2016 issue. 

Meredith Mawhar says she settled on her new career because she was excited by the Research Challenge, a prestigious competition for college students sponsored by the  Chartered Financial Analyst Institute.

Mawhar is a student at UH Manoa’s Shidler College of Business who already has a degree in zoology. “I actually chose to become a finance major because I heard about this challenge,” she says. “… I love financial analysis and research. When I was back in zoology, I did a lot of research and I love that process, trying to figure out what’s going on, what factors are at play.”

The team from UH Manoa has won the Hawaii final the past four times it has competed and this year Mawhar leads a team of five that includes two graduate students. “A lot of us want to go into some form of financial analysis or equity research for careers,” she says, “so I think this is a great way to test drive the duties we’d like to do after graduation.”

To read more, go to http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/buy-sell-or-hold/.

Is that really a service dog?

This article was published in the February 2016 issue. 

Brian Kajiyama, an instructor in UH’s Department of Special Education, who has cerebral palsy, has an undeniable need for his trained service dog, Zeus. Such dogs get years of training so they can help their human partners, and Zeus can pick up things when Kajiyama uses sign commands.

Together, he says, they have encountered dogs whose owners masquerade them as trained service dogs. Some are tiny dogs wearing red vests with “service dog” patches that bark at Zeus – a behavior that a true service dog would not do in such circumstances.

“Of course my dog reacts, as he’s protective and also curious,” says Kajiyama, “but this places my legitimate service dog at risk for being seen as untrained or not as professional.”

The prevalence of fake service dogs means Kajiyama is sometimes asked to show credentials for his dog: Once at Kualoa Beach and another time at a Kmart store, he says. Both times, employees explained there had been increases in people bringing in dogs they labeled falsely as service dogs.

To read more, go to: http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/is-that-really-a-service-dog/.